This is a journal of my vegetable gardens. Skippy was my first dog and he always thought the garden was his. Even though I do all the work, he always stood by me. I'm located near Boston (in USDA zone 6A). I have a community plot and a backyard vegetable garden. I use sustainable organic methods and try to grow all of my family's vegetables.

Sunday, May 04, 2008

perfect weather for peas

tall telphone
peas capucijners
Its perfect weather for the peas - rainy and cool. I ended up with an whole bed full of sprouts. There are four types:

"Pisello nano": A dwarf plant about 1 foot tall (70 days). Medium sized pods of about 6 green peas per pod. These did well in my garden last year.

"Tall telephone (Alderman)": A new variety of green pea I'm trying this year. 6 ft tall with very high yields. Pods are late and are produced over a long cropping period. The pods are large (up to six inches) containing eight to nine peas each. Introduced in 1878 (75 days).

"Sugar Sprint": A new stringless variety of snap pea about 24 to 30 inches high. Last year these were very sweet and very productive over a long season in my garden (62 days).

"Capucijner peas" (also called "Raisin Pea" or "Monk Pea"): An heirloom soup pea developed by Capuchin monks in the Netherlands in the 1500's. The peas are brown with a rough, wrinkled, raisin-like texture. Flowers are pink and pods a beautiful purple color (90 days).

Pisum sativum


Blogger Sandy said...

Hi, Kathy,

I enjoy your blog very much.
Do you always plant seeds all in one tray together? How do you transplant them into the garden?


May 05, 2008 12:14 PM

Blogger kathy said...

I plant many seeds much too close together. Its a bad habit. It makes it hard to transplant them. It would be much better to plant a couple seeds per plant cell and thin to a single plant. It would be easier on the plants for transplanting.

I did this for my tomatoes and peppers. But other plants like my lettuce, beets, marigolds, etc, I have planted too many too close. I carefully pull the roots apart and transplant them. They have all been doing pretty good in spite of me.

May 05, 2008 2:56 PM

Blogger Sandy said...

At least you're not throwing away plastic plug trays! I did that this year and still feel guilty about it. I think next spring I'll try using peat pots or get one of those tools that make newspaper pots.

May 05, 2008 5:25 PM

Blogger kathy said...

I like to reuse my pots and trays. I have a big stack of them in the garage. (Too big.) The plastic just works really well. Cheaper than peat, especially if you reuse several years. Newspaper pots are fun to make, but do take some time.

May 06, 2008 8:10 AM

Blogger yelpes said...

Hi Kathy,
Just wanted to ask you about sugar peas. This is my first time planting them. I've got the one that grows 24" tall. How do you support those? Would you plant them along a fence?
My Mom planted them along the fence and she says it's hard to take them off the fence in the fall.
What would you suggest?

May 08, 2008 8:56 AM


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