This is a journal of my vegetable gardens. Skippy was my first dog and he thought the garden was his, even though I did all the work. But Skippy always stood by me and was a great friend. Now Suzie and Charley follow in his footsteps and garden with me. We're located near Boston (USDA zone 6A). I have a community plot, a backyard vegetable garden, fruit trees and berry bushes, chickens and bees. I use sustainable organic methods and do my best to grow all of my family's vegetables myself.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

rusty old garden tools

rusty old cultivator
garden tools tools

I came across some abandoned garden tools yesterday. A cultivator, a hoe, two edging tools and a nice shovel. Looks like they've seen better days, but these will be great for my community plot. And nothing like free tools.

I found these tips on-line for refurbishing rusted tools and will give it a try some day this winter:

# Remove rust by securing the tool in a clamp and then cleaning with a wire brush, sandpaper and steel wool. Penetrating oil will help with the more stubborn spots.

# Sand down splintered handles and then rub with linseed oil to restore to a smooth finish.

# The important thing is to oil garden tools, coating them heavily when storing.

10 Comments:

Blogger Amy said...

I would love to see how this turn out if you refinish them this winter!

November 19, 2008 9:26 PM

 
Blogger Dan said...

They will be as good as new when you are done with them. I'd hate to see what a big box store tool would look like after receive the punished those old tools did.

I think I am half slow gardener and half procrastinating gardener. The two mixed together can make things take forever.

hmm, I like the look of that pumpkin on the seed pack. I will be looking forward to watching them grow next year.

November 19, 2008 10:41 PM

 
Anonymous inadvertentfarmer said...

The only problem with refurbishing them is that they won't take such lovely pictures!!!

November 20, 2008 12:29 AM

 
Blogger kathy said...

My son says the problem is they'll fall apart without the rust holding them together.

November 20, 2008 4:34 PM

 
Blogger Charles said...

Kathy,

Your garden pictures are beautiful!
Thanks for your post featuring your found treasure.
We are gardeners in central Virginia's Blue Ridge mountains.
I'm originally from Boston & my wife Janet's family hails from the new England states of Maine & New Hampshire.

Please visit our website:
http://www.waycoooltools.com
We'd like to know what you think.

November 23, 2008 7:32 PM

 
Blogger Jon Whittom said...

Give this a try...

http://www.evaporust.com/evaporust.html

Works like a charm.
John

November 26, 2008 8:35 AM

 
Blogger Steelbuilding Steel said...

Thank you for the interesting post. When you talk about landscaping and gardening a thing you cannot forget is the garden sheds which helps to store your gardening equipment. Steel Garden Sheds are the newest trend in market. They are easy to set up and long lasting. Furthermore they are a great money saver.

December 11, 2008 12:02 PM

 
Anonymous marc said...

I am currently doing a project with old garden spades and folks if anyone has any that are beyond repair that i could take off their hamds or if anyone knows of where i could find any old spades or folks that would be much appreciated.

July 15, 2009 11:05 AM

 
Blogger Pushkelka said...

Great article. As a fellow gardener, these tips come in handy for my gardening!

March 19, 2010 6:45 AM

 
Anonymous Gardening Tools said...

Great thoughts you got there, believe I may possibly try just some of it throughout my daily life.

November 13, 2010 4:23 AM

 

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