This is a journal of my vegetable gardens. Skippy was my first dog and he thought the garden was his, even though I did all the work. But Skippy always stood by me and was a great friend. Now Suzie and Charley follow in his footsteps and garden with me. We're located near Boston (USDA zone 6A). I have a community plot, a backyard vegetable garden, fruit trees and berry bushes, chickens and bees. I use sustainable organic methods and do my best to grow all of my family's vegetables myself.

Friday, September 29, 2017

butternut squash portrait

All my butternuts got together for a family portrait. It's been a good year. Eleven big squash from four plants.

squash IMG_0459

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4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

We have 10 and I don't care for it!

September 30, 2017 5:26 AM

 
Blogger kathy said...

There's always the Food Pantry!

September 30, 2017 7:52 AM

 
Blogger CHRIS said...

so pretty! i just harvested one of mine yesterday but have several more till on the vine. i'm new too growing these though and a bit confused about when they are ready to pick. the skin color seems right on all of them but they do still have a little green striping near the stems. most stems are no longer green in color but instead really hard and brown. i was planning to give them a little extra time on the vine. does that seem right to you? not sure how much longer the vines will hold out but i figured it couldn't hurt....

September 30, 2017 2:05 PM

 
Blogger kathy said...

Yes. It usually can't hurt to leave them on the vine. I was afraid of chipmunks taking a nibble, so I picked mine as they ripened. I grow my butternuts on a trellis and the vine can always support the squash, even if it's hanging. (Not so with other winter squash varieties.) A hard stem is a good indication of ripeness. But I go by the tendril. Each fruit has a leaf and tendril at the same node. When the tendril dies, the squash is ripe. I go by that rather than the squash color. I find color can vary and it doesn't necessarily predict taste or how long the squash will keep. It's great if you have no critters and can leave the squash on the vine until just before the frost.

September 30, 2017 7:56 PM

 

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